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When loving your enemy feels unjust

Thanks to social media, news has spread quickly about the tragic shooting at Emmanuel AME in Charleston, South Carolina last night. The death of my Christian brothers and sisters weighs heavy on me this morning.

As I read the description of the young man who killed nine people after an hour of sitting in a prayer meeting with them, I felt the unfamiliar sting of hate. Hatred is not something I’ve felt often in my life – but I suddenly found myself burning with a desire for vengeance.

I tried to remind myself that this young man has a story. And I tried to remember the words of my beloved savior:

You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. – Matthew 5:43-46

So I am called not only to love this young man, but also to pray for him?

I closed my eyes, imagining the the pain of living with poisonous hate. I tried to find ways I could dissolve my vengeful feelings just enough to pray for this young man. I tried.

But any prayerful breath for this person who killed 9 people while they prayed felt wasted….even sinful. It felt like breath that should be saved to pray for the loved ones of those killed. It felt like breath that should used to groan in mourning. It felt like breath that should be used to petition for the kingdom to come now – Lord please come.

Any breath used to speak on behalf of this young man feels unjust.

So what now?

I pray anyway. I pray, then I hope love comes later.

I thank God for his redeeming grace and love, and pray that this young man be found and brought to justice – but that he may find warmth and reconciliation in the embrace of God’s holy spirit.

I praise God he reigns with both mercy and justice, and ask that he might give me the internal peace needed to be merciful to all.

I pray for the healing power of the Holy Spirit to move swiftly through communities fragmented by racial tension.

I pray for the wisdom needed to act justly, and advocate for others.

I pray anyway.

Will you pray with me?

Lord,
I confess that nearly as often as I breathe I contribute to injustice,
but I believe in the hope of your coming kingdom and the grace of your son Jesus Christ whose goodness transcends my misdeeds.
I believe that at the heart of your Gospel is reconciliation –
show us the path, my God, to peace and reconciliation today.
My God, My Hope,
Grant me the humility to hear the brokenhearted;
Lend me the grace to embrace those who I do not understand or even despise;
and Empower me with the courage to act on behalf of, and alongside, those who do not look like me.
Jehovah our Healer,
Mend our hearts,
heal our system,
redeem our country,
Bring your Kingdom.
Amen.

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Why I Didn’t Give Up Anything for Lent: Learning to Give Myself Some Grace

By Guest Blogger Matt Hoffman

For as long as I can remember, I have given up something for Lent each year. When I was younger, it was chocolate or caffeine. In college, I graduated to giving up snack foods and meat. Recently, the fad has been to “take on” some practice—maybe thirty minutes of meditation or prayer each day (if you are looking for a creative thing to take on, I had a friend who adopted the practice of never eating lunch or dinner alone during the entire 40 days). Such practices have been important for me during Lent because they have increased my awareness of God’s presence in my life.

This Lent has been different. Breaking with tradition, I decided that I would neither give up something, nor would I take on an additional practice this year. Indeed, the Lenten devotional book from my church is still sitting in my school bag, unopened. I am not sure if my decision was due to laziness or being “busy,” but to be honest, I just couldn’t bring myself to any sort of Lenten practice.

Reflecting on this decision, it has become apparent that my choice was not so much an act of rebellion but one of mature faith. When certain practices begin to feel like burdens, it is important to reflect on how these practices draw us closer to God. What is the reason for engaging in such a practice? Are we just going through the motions? Most importantly, it is necessary to extend ourselves some grace when it comes to spiritual practices.

Liturgically speaking, the Lenten season is a time to pray, fast, and repent for our sins. Mirroring Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness (in Matthew, Mark, & Luke), this solemn season marks a time of introspection and closeness with God. In Lent, we have the opportunity to know Jesus as a fellow human, someone who experienced temptations and desires.

Facing the option of whether to engage with Lent this year, I simply chose to opt out. This does not mean that I am opting out of the season or the responsibility of reflecting on how I fall short of my potential and cause harm by my (in)action in the world. It simply means that there are times in our lives when we must learn to claim our spiritual agency. I do not believe that God is marking down on a large notebook whether we participated in each part of the human-created liturgical calendar. Moreover, God is not keeping tally of each time we forget to pray or decide that we cannot forgive someone right in the moment. God is not watching out for each piece of Lenten chocolate eaten or each 30-minute prayer session slept through. Instead, we must learn to extend a little bit more grace to ourselves.

The joy of grace is knowing that we do not have to be perfect. It is okay to ask for a “timeout.” Indeed, this time of the year can already be stressful enough with looming midterms exams, family vacations, Easter dinners, etc. So, if Lent this year is not your thing, give yourself some grace. God does not want you to be perfect. If you need a break, take one. I won’t tell.

So, if the doldrums of life/Lent have you down, remember that God’s grace abounds. Live fully into this grace knowing that no one is marking your progress on a clipboard this Lenten season. Take a break and love yourself.

For those of you who have added a practice or have given up something for Lent, I salute you. But, whatever you do, please give yourself a little grace in the process. And, if you decide that you need a break from Lent, I support that too.

At least there will be two of us who are not Lent-ing.

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Christian Witnessing: An Evangelical’s Guide to Interfaith Engagement

By Kevin Garrity, High Point University Student

Last week in my Contemporary Theology class I was reminded of what it means to be a witness to the miracle of Jesus Christ. We were learning about the famous theologian, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who used an analogy for Christian witnessing in terms of a trial. The professor explained that there are various actors involved in a trial – such as a judge, the prosecution, and witnesses.

As an evangelical Christian, witnessing is a fundamental part of my faith. Oftentimes, I feel at odds when witnessing to, and identifying with, people from different religious traditions. I think this is because of the sensitivity required for sharing my faith in a non-abrasive way. Thinking about these different actors in a trial has given me a better sense of how to both honor my religious convictions, and identify with individuals who do not come from Christian backgrounds.

I will share what I have learned from Bonhoeffer’s analogy here. I hope that you too will find it a helpful guide to navigate interfaith engagement, and that you come away with a better understanding of what it means to be a witness of the Christian faith.

The role of prosecutors is to prove the wrongdoing of another, while the judge’s job is to make a decision on whether or not an individual’s actions are deserving of punishment. Scripture indicates, though, that we do not have the capacity to fulfill either of these roles: “There is only one lawgiver and judge, he who is able to save and to destroy. But who are you to judge your neighbor?” (James 4:12).

One should take notice that this verse is condemning judgment of one’s neighbors, not personal judgment. Of course it is necessary for Christian believers need to be the judges of their own actions, but no one is in a position to condemn the beliefs of others.

Abstaining from judgement or condemnation does not mean that doubt or criticism of other faith traditions should remain un-verbalized. It means that the doubt or criticism must not exist in the mind of a Christian believer at all.

For me, withholding judgment starts from my deep belief that the Christian faith is my ultimate truth. And, while I maintain this as a personal truth, withholding judgment ends through exercising a sense of humility – acknowledging that my personal truth, which is ultimate for me, may not be the only truth for everyone.

Having humility is necessary to be a witness. Witnesses are members of a trial who share what they have experienced. They do not speak to the experiences of others because their concern is only what they have seen, heard, and felt. And further, trial witnesses only share their experiences when they are called upon, or invited to do so.

The question is, how can Christians think about their role as witnesses in interfaith settings?

Christian faith is legitimized when the witness speaking about their faith, and telling their story, exudes a sort of character that makes a listener want to share the same faith as the storyteller. The convincingness of the witness then relies not on what they say they believe, but on how much the statements of faith seem to influence their life.

Witnesses are only as convincing as how well their story of faith aligns with their character. Rather than telling someone what they should or should not believe, Christians must focus on living out the faith they hope to share; a faith that tells us we are incapable of judging anyone but ourselves.

 

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The #1 Tip for Engaging Evangelicals in Interfaith Work is…

As a Christian working at an interfaith organization, I am frequently asked how to engage evangelicals. Here at Faithline Protestants we’ve written a lot about the subject, but there’s one issue that I’ve seen that comes up again and again. If I were to pick one tip for communities interested in engaging evangelicals in interfaith work, if would be this: Define interfaith cooperation.

Here’s why. A few years ago, my IFYC colleagues visited a campus that was interested in how they could build and sustain interfaith initiatives in their community. During that visit, we met with several campus groups, students and staff. A few of our Christian colleagues met with a conservative evangelical group that heard we were coming to campus, and were skeptical about our intentions, so they requested a meeting. After hearing us out, the group said this: “We can’t do interfaith work. But, if you want organize an event, bringing together people of different faiths to do a service project, and afterwards we can talk about how Jesus inspires us to serve, we can definitely do that.” We were thrilled! People of different traditions coming together to serve and talk about their religious or secular values? That’s interfaith work! Our new friends just didn’t want to call it interfaith.

What struck me about that story is that the biggest barrier to getting this particular group on board to do interfaith work was the label “interfaith” – and common misconceptions about the word. Some that I hear most often in my work: “Interfaith is wanting everyone to be one religion” “Interfaith where you have to water down your faith to the least common denominator” “Interfaith work is only for folks on the liberal end of the political spectrum” “Interfaith is people of different traditions worshiping together” – none of these are true based on the way we define interfaith cooperation.

At IFYC, we define interfaith as respect for people’s diverse religious and nonreligious identities, mutually inspiring relationships between people of different backgrounds, and common action for the common good. Interfaith cooperation is not syncretistic or relativistic; that means that you don’t have to water down your identity to come to the table of interfaith cooperation – whether you’re an evangelical, Muslim, Hindu, Jew, or an atheist, you don’t have to compromise what you believe (or what you don’t believe) to engage in interfaith work. We recognize there are shared values across different traditions, and there are very real differences – while we may not agree who goes to heaven, or even if there is a heaven, but we can agree that homelessness is a problem in our community, and we should do something about it. Our definition of interfaith is founded on a sociological – not theological – principle of pluralism that acknowledges the potential for diverse religious and nonreligious to build positive relationships and social cohesion. That means that when even when folks of different backgrounds disagree, there is still a sense of common ground between them.

Those of us that work in the interfaith field, or regularly engage in interfaith work can forget the importance of defining interfaith cooperation for folks new to this work. So, if you’re hoping to engage evangelical communities – or most other communities, for that matter – in interfaith work, define what interfaith is, and what it isn’t. Emphasize that folks across the theological and philosophical spectrum, whether liberal or conservative, are welcome.

The interfaith table is set, and you are welcome here.

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3 Goals for the New Year

I know that New Year’s was last week, but if you’re like me, you might be little late setting goals for 2015. Many people commit to losing weight or being more active at the start of a New Year, but I think there is also a great opportunity to reflect on our lives as Christians and set goals for walking more closely with God.

Here are three goals from scripture that I hope to follow in the New Year:

1)    Do not put the LORD your God to the test (Matt 4:7)

When we set specific expectations for God to help us in particular ways, or bring us new opportunities, or make something better in our lives, we are testing God and setting ourselves up for disappointment. As Christians, we know that Jesus did not abandon us in his death on the cross, but rose to new life so that we might also share in the promises of the Kingdom of Heaven. We celebrated God’s coming into the world on Christmas and we know that God continues to be with us in all moments and in all aspects of our lives through the presence of the Holy Spirit. Yet we often test the presence and work of God by praying for specific outcomes or solutions–I know I do. And testing God in this way can make us blind to the unexpected and remarkable ways God works in the world.

As a seminary student, I can sometimes feel confused or conflicted about the things I learn and the conversations I have with my classmates. For a long time this semester I was praying for God to move in my courses and to help me find ways to feel more connected to my classmates. I didn’t feel like God was responding to my prayers and I felt frustrated. It wasn’t until I had a long phone conversation with a Jewish friend of mine from college. She and I vented together about our struggles in graduate school and laughed out loud about some of the ridiculous (and frustrating) experiences we were having. For whatever reason, that conversation lifted something in me that allowed me to go back to school with renewed energy and fresh insight. Nothing actually changed in my school life, but I realized later that God had answered my prayers in an unexpected way. I wonder how many times God has worked in my life and I have missed it because I have been testing, or waiting for God to respond my way.

2)    Let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in Heaven (Matt 5:16)

As a student it is easy for me to theorize and theologize, but it is much harder to put my thoughts and beliefs into action. The question I want to ask myself this year is: how will I share my Christian faith with others? If it is only by the cross around my neck, or my attendance at church, or what I know about Christian thought and practice, then I have missed a big part of what it means to be a follower of Jesus. We should be able to show our faith through our actions and how we treat others. I think about the story of the Good Samaritan and I wonder how often I have passed by opportunities to help others because of racial, religious, or cultural differences. I wonder what opportunities I have missed to receive help from others because of those same differences.

Jesus seems to imply that when we do good, the people around us will recognize the power and grace of God. This year I want to commit to letting my actions speak louder than my thoughts and words. Whether it is standing in solidarity with people of color who are targets of police brutality, or smiling at a Muslim woman wearing a hijab on the subway who is receiving skeptical stares from other passengers, or listening with care and sincerity to the stories of people who are radically different than myself–I want to strive to do good for the sake of bringing greater glory to God.

3)    Come to me, all you who are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest (Matt 11:28)

Life is tiring and sometimes school work, regular work, friends, family, and all of the challenges of life can feel overwhelming. Sometimes I have so many questions and concerns that it is hard to fall asleep at night. This year, I want to commit to giving my questions and my burdens to God. You might be thinking: easier said than done. I feel like that a lot. But God promises us to give us rest from our hardships. Jesus offers himself to us and allows us to rest in the knowledge that he can handle even our most difficult situations. Jesus invites us to fall into his arms and rest. I want to commit to accepting God’s grace and resisting the pride that makes me feel as if I can handle everything on my own. For many around the globe, 2014 was a year of tragedy, loss, and frustration. What to do in the face of unexplainable, or insurmountable struggle is not easy to figure out on one’s own.

At my school last semester, students strived to figure out how to respond to the threats of police brutality in black and brown communities in our city, New York. As I watched students pray and cry and ask God for guidance, I realized how little I am sometimes willing to do this in my own life. Eventually what was born on our campus was a thoughtful and coordinated response of peaceful organizing, bold action, and open dialogue. Students did not just give their problems to God and pray for peace of mind; they offered their sadness and anger to God and received insight and renewed energy for action.

I wonder how I can seek rest and refuge in the knowledge of God’s grace and how God might take my burdens and offer me opportunities or new perspectives and new action in 2015.

So these are some of my goals for the New Year. What are your goals? How do you hope to strengthen your relationship to God this year? How will you commit to embracing God’s creation, striving for God’s justice on earth, and seeking the personal strength to let the light of Christ shine in you in all that you do? This year, 2015, will be different for each of us, but the mission of knowing God, serving God, and striving for God’s Kingdom is the same for all of us–sometimes setting goals can make our path a little clear.

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Take the #ScriptureChallenge

Today’s Guest Post on Faithline Protestants is by Nick Price and a follow-up piece to a couple of posts Nick wrote in the last few weeks. Nick is currently a student at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, MO, and is a former staff member for InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA. As an Evangelical Christian, Nick feels called by his faith to encourage Evangelical Christian participation in the interfaith movement. Nick was profiled in a video by 30 Good Minutes, in which he discusses his faith as an Evangelical and his commitment to interfaith work. He was also invited to write series for RELEVANT Magazine, in which he shared his Christian convictions for doing interfaith work. Nick is also the author of Prodigal Preacher, a blog that explores his experiences in seminary, where he wrote a 3 part series outlining his own theology of interfaith cooperation.

 

Religious illiteracy is a problem. Books and research have shown that a majority of Americans are becoming increasingly illiterate when it comes not only to their own faith traditions, but also when it comes to the religion of others. The result is increasing fear and mistrust of people from other faith traditions as well as an inability to articulate your own faith to those from other religious backgrounds.

So this is my small attempt to correct this problem. Welcome to the #ScriptureChallenge!!!

Like the famous (infamous?) #IceBucketChallenge, the #ScriptureChallenge is a chance to raise awareness. But this time it is a chance to raise awareness about another faith tradition. Here is how the #ScriptureChallenge works.

Step 1: Commit to reading through your own Scriptures within a year. For my fellow Christians, this means reading through 3 chapters of the Bible a day. This should get you most of the way through the Bible in 365 days.

Why is this important? It is important to have a robust understanding of your own faith tradition as you interact with those of other religious traditions. It allows you to find common ground as well as know how to articulate your differences.

Step 2:   Read through the Scriptures of another faith tradition within a year, pairing it with another book from that tradition to provide you with some context.

For example, I have decided that, in order to better understand my Muslim neighbors, I am going to read through the Qur’an. As my partner book, I will also read through Farid Esack’s The Qur’an: A User’s Guide in order to better acquaint myself with this rich text.

For those who want to learn about my own faith tradition, I would recommend reading through the Bible and pairing it with, How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth or How to Read the Bible Book-By-Book: A Guided Tour.

Step 3: Nominate some friends to do it with you. Personally, I’m nominating the rest of the Faithline Protestants writers to take this challenge with me. Make sure you encourage them to write down what they are reading.

Step 4:  Tweet, Facebook, and hashtag it!!! #ScriptureChallenge

My hope is that we will all learn something, both about our own faith traditions, but also about the faith traditions of those around us. Let the challenge begin!!!

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6 Chaplains Walk Into a Hospital…

What do you get when you put two Reform Jews, three Episcopalians, and a Presbyterian together in a hospital to minister to the sick and grieving for ten weeks?

I haven’t been able to come up with a punchy one-line answer yet—but let me know if you can think of any.  This has been my summer so far. In early June, six of us from Jewish and Christian seminaries around New York City embarked on our first unit of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE)—a requirement for most clergy-in-training that involves offering pastoral care to people in need, in a clinical setting. Our hospital ID badges say “Chaplain Intern,” but what it means to be a chaplain—as I have learned over and over again—is ambiguous, and often has more to do with what the person we happen to be serving wants (or needs) us to be, than what we believe we are.

When someone asks us about our faith traditions—even though we are all deeply connected to specific traditions—we are instructed to say something along these lines: I am an interfaith chaplain and I’m here to serve the spiritual and emotional needs of patients in the hospital, no matter what their faith or philosophical tradition may be. Still,patients often project their own faiths onto us—there was the Episcopalian chaplain who has been repeatedly called Rabbi, the Jewish chaplain who was thanked for her work and her inspiring faith in Jesus; I have had multiple patients assume I am Catholic. For the most part, we don’t correct these assumptions, not because we don’t care, but because our job in the hospital is not to share our identities with others, but to listen, to pray, and to walk with those who are suffering. Why should a patient who is just coming out of a four-week coma after a stroke care if I’m an Episcopalian, or even a Christian for that matter? Much more important is that the patient can express her feelings and know that God is with her and is listening to her prayers.

That’s not to say that it has been easy to “set aside” our faith traditions. There are times that I have wanted to talk about Jesus or quote New Testament scripture and have had to hold back. But being able to talk about Jesus isn’t what makes me a Christian. I am a Christian because my beliefs and my relationship to Jesus inform the way I live my life and interact with others. Even if I don’t tell a patient that I am Christian, my Christian beliefs are what “get me in the door,” so to speak. My personal faith is the ground I stand on when I meet with patients. It is what helps me to understand the suffering I witness; it is what allows me to love each patient I encounter, regardless of our differences; it is what challenges me to keep coming back. In that way, I haven’t had to set aside my faith at all.

Throughout our first four weeks, each of us has been challenged to define our own theologies of pastoral care, of suffering, and of grief. Many of us have been with family members at the time of a loved one’s death; we have listened to patients who are experiencing excruciating pain, who have been diagnosed with incurable diseases, who feel hopeless about the possibility of healing—and we have to figure out how we can find the tools within our personal faith traditions to be a presence of God’s love to those we encounter. So, what do you get when you put two Reform Jews, three Episcopalians, and a Presbyterian together in a hospital to minister to the sick and grieving for ten weeks? You probably have to be there for yourself to know for sure—and even then, it’s hard to articulate. But I can say that, in my own experience, not being able to talk directly about my faith has forced me to figure out how to live my faith in a way that speaks louder than words. I can’t say that I always do it well, but I am committed to trying as hard as I can. Perhaps what you get is a group of people who can’t hide behind their intellects and religious platitudes—perhaps you get raw, real religion.

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3 Reasons Evangelicals Don’t Do Interfaith Dialogue & 3 Ways Forward

FLP is excited to feature a guest blog by Josh Daneshforooz. Josh is an author and international speaker on leadership, peacemaking and personal development. Author of the Loving Our Religious Neighbors curriculum, he spearheads social change campaigns between disparate religious communities. Josh is also founding partner at East Africa Property Partners and founder of All Nations Education, an organization that empowers young adults through mentorship and higher education in developing countries.

“Evangelicals are consistently the most difficult community with whom we attempt to collaborate,” an executive of a well-respected interfaith organization recently told me on a phone call.

As I’ve become increasingly engaged in the movement for peace among different faith communities, I’ve noticed there’s one regularly absent Christian community: evangelicals.

Most people who attend the big interfaith conferences such as the Parliament of the World’s Religions, who co-organize local community service projects and who participate in dialogue sessions are of a liberal persuasion—both Christian and non-Christian alike.

But what about the more conservative types, like me? More specifically, and more relevant for this post, what about the 100 million evangelicals in the US and the other 400 million around the world? Why has our seat at the table remained empty for so long?

With an American evangelical mother and an Iranian Muslim father, I grew up straddling two worlds. Though I was shaped in certain ways by both sides, the main spiritual community that shaped my values and beliefs was a large evangelical church in Las Vegas.

As a child I developed a subconscious fear that intentionally building relationships of mutual respect and learning across religious boundaries was somehow not consistent with the teachings of Jesus. Throughout the past ten years, I’ve attempted to understand this fear. Along the way, I’ve met many other evangelicals who share my concerns.

After learning to overcome my own fears, I created the Loving Our Religious Neighbors (LORN) curriculum as a resource to enable others to overcome theirs too. Today LORN empowers evangelical communities to build lasting relationships of conviction and respect with non-Christian religious communities as they work together to serve the poor and tackle social problems.

Leading LORN campaigns throughout the United States has taught me that evangelicals typically don’t do interfaith work for three reasons. In response to these three concerns, I’ve developed approaches in LORN for equipping evangelicals to take their place at the table of peace.

1. Don’t Want to Compromise the Teachings of Jesus

“When you hear the phrase ‘interfaith’ or ‘interreligious dialogue’, what usually comes to mind?” This is the question I ask at the beginning of every LORN campaign.

Krista, a member at a church in Boston, responded, “The first thing that comes to mind when I hear those phrases is that all religions lead to the same mountaintop. All religions are the same. Mixing theologies. But I just don’t believe that. So I don’t usually get involved in interfaith initiatives. I don’t want to compromise my faith.”

Evangelicals often equate interfaith work with theological relativism, and as a result, those who do participate are frequently faced with judgment from their own community.

The essence of evangelicalism teaches that faith is life and life is faith. Asking an evangelical to put her faith, her life, aside in the name of dialogue is like asking the body to remove the heart and continue to circulate blood.

How Do We Overcome This Concern? 

Establish a biblical foundation. Jesus says, “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God” (Matthew 5:9). In LORN campaigns, we are empowering evangelicals not to water down their faith but to put it into practice as peacemakers as we take ownership of our title as “children of God.” The LORN curriculum also lays a biblical foundation in the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23).

2. Don’t Want To Abandon Sharing the Good News

Evangelism, or sharing the Good News of the Gospel, is a pillar of the message of Jesus: “Go and make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19). Pastors and leaders are constantly strategizing new ways of inviting people into authentic community, growing the Church and ultimately spreading the news that the Kingdom of God is at hand (Matthew 10:7).

This message is the foundation of the evangelical growth paradigm and, I hope and pray, the major motivation for expansion. Today many megachurches have multiple campuses. Central Christian Church where I grew up, for example, has grown from one thousand members and one campus when I was 10 years old to 15 thousand weekly attendees and 10 campuses not only in the Las Vegas valley but also across the U.S. and around the world.

The word “evangelical” comes from the Greek word meaning “good news.” Asking an evangelical to put aside sharing the Gospel in the name of dialogue is like asking an Olympian to stop competing in the middle of the Olympics. Sharing the good news is just what we do—because Jesus teaches us to.

How Do We Overcome This Concern? 

Imagine new ways of sharing the Gospel. Instead of using older forms of evangelism, LORN, among other things, equips Christians to share their “Public Testimonies.” I define public testimony in LORN as the “skill of communicating your faith with conviction and respect (1 Pet. 3:15) in a multi-religious society.”

3. Fear of Violence 

Sam is an active member at an evangelical church in Texas. After hearing his senior pastor talk about the importance of building respectful relationships with local Muslims, Sam became fearful and asked, “Why would I become friends with them? They blew us up. I’m not going to let them anywhere near my family.”

Many evangelicals like Sam have never met a Muslim or a Buddhist or a Sikh or even a Catholic or liberal Protestant. The only Muslims they know are the suicide bombers whom they see in the media daily. So they make generalizations such as, “They blew us up.”

Our ignorance often breeds fear, and our fear can cause us to express violent attitudes and use violent speech. This is often true of human beings in general, conservative Christians not being an exception. Some evangelicals fear violent and forceful Muslims, yet they project violent and forceful attitudes out of fear.

How Do We Overcome This Concern? 

Meet your religious neighbors. I’ve learned that the single most powerful way to overcome misunderstanding and prejudice is to develop lasting friendships.

After Sam met Muslim families in his suburb, he said, “I get it. These people are normal, just like my family. They’re not violent. Now I’m on board with what our pastor is teaching: We can remain committed Christians while being friends with our neighbors who come from all over the world.” This is precisely why LORN is not simply a book; it’s a curriculum that’s used in a 5-week campaign that culminates in a day of multi-faith community service and relationship building with our religious neighbors.

1 John 4:18 says, “There is no fear in love. But perfect love drives out fear…. The one who fears is not made perfect in love.” If we respond out of fear to our religious neighbors, we are not responding out of our faith. Instead we are reacting out of our fallen humanity because we have not been perfected in love. When the waves of fear come crashing down on the seashore of multi-faith engagement, let us stand on the rock of the One who casts out all fear.

Will You Join Us?
Start A Loving Our Religious Neighbors Campaign Today
 

LORN is now available! We are in the process of launching in evangelical churches and on college campuses across the United States. Go to the following link for the 3 Steps to Start a LORN Campaign.

Also, click here for a video on “How to Launch and Sustain a LORN College Campus Team.”

And click here for a video on “How to Launch LORN at a Church or in a Christian Organization.”

Or email me directly to get involved: josh@lorneighbors.com.

Visit www.LORNeighbors.com to get a copy of the curriculum.

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